Answered By: ic @westernsydney.edu.au
Last Updated: Sep 30, 2021     Views: 11

Use journal metrics to understand the impact of a journal. Impact Factors should be used with other indicators, to assess a journal’s impact, such as:

Quartile Rank (Q1, Q2, Q3, Q4) – journals that appear in the first quartile of a list (Q1) represent the top 25% of journals in that subject, key sources are:

The impact factor (IF) or journal impact factor (JIF) of an academic journal is a scientometric index calculated by Clarivate that reflects the yearly mean number of citations of articles published in the last two years in a given journal, as indexed by Clarivate's Web of Science

Additionally, IF Rank (JIF – Journal Impact Factor) - shows the journal’s positional rank within a subject area( e.g., 2/256 means that the journal is ranked 2nd out of 256 journals in that subject area). Positions are ordered by Journal Impact Factor (JCR) or citation weighting (SJR).

SCImago

  • h-index – Although originally conceived as an author-level metric, the h-index has been being applied to higher-order aggregations of research publications, including journals. Publishing in a high h-index journal maximises your chances of being cited by other authors and, consequently, may improve your own personal h-index score. In SCImago, the h-index is a journal’s number of articles (h) that have received at least h citations over the whole period.
  • SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) quartiles for journals from Scopus, this is the best quartile for all subject categories.
  • SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) - is a measure of a journal's impact, influence, or prestige. It is based on the concept of a transfer of prestige between journals via their citation links. It expresses the average number of weighted citations received in the selected year by the documents published in the journal in the three previous years.

Scopus

  • h-index – Although originally conceived as an author-level metric, the h-index has been being applied to higher-order aggregations of research publications, including journals. Publishing in a high h-index journal maximises your chances of being cited by other authors and, consequently, may improve your own personal h-index score. Scopus Includes Citation Tracker, a feature that shows how often an author has been cited. It is the largest abstract and citation database of peer-reviewed literature.
  • SNIP (Source Normalized Impact per Paper) - is a sophisticated metric that accounts for field-specific differences in citation practices.
  • CiteScore metrics – is a family of eight indicators to analyse the publication influence of serial titles. Helps to measure journal citation impact. Reflects the average number of citations to articles published in science and social science journals. Calculated using data from Scopus.

Web of Science

  • IF (JIF - Journal Impact Factor)) - is the 2-year journal Impact Factor calculated by Clarivate Analytics as all citations to the journal in the current JCR year to items published in the previous two years, divided by the total number of scholarly items (these comprise articles, reviews, and proceedings papers) published in the journal in the previous two years. Only journals listed in the Science Citation Index Expanded (SCIE) and Social Sciences Citation Index (SSCI) receive an Impact Factor.[1]

  • 5-Year JIF (Journal Impact Factor) - is the 5-year journal Impact Factor, available from 2007 onward, is the average number of times articles from the journal published in the past five years have been cited in the JCR year.

  • h-index – Although originally conceived as an author-level metric, the h-index has been being applied to higher-order aggregations of research publications, including journals. Publishing in a high h-index journal maximises your chances of being cited by other authors and, consequently, may improve your own personal h-index score. Web of Science - is a digital platform that provides the h-index with its Citation Reports feature.

  • Eigenfactor - is a PageRank-type measure of journal influence to the scientific community, considering the origin of the incoming citations. It’s a reflection of the density of the network of citations around the journal using 5 years of cited content as cited by the Current Year. It considers both the number of citations and the source of those citations so that highly cited sources will influence the network more than less cited sources. Eigenfactor scores can be used in combination with the h-index to evaluate the work of individual scientists.

  • Article Influence score - measures the average influence of articles in the journal and is therefore comparable to the traditional impact factor. It normalises the Eigenfactor Score according to the cumulative size of the cited journal across the prior five years.
  • Immediacy Index - the Immediacy Index is the count of citations in the current year to the journal that reference content in this same year. Journals that have a consistently high Immediacy Index attract citations rapidly. 

Google Scholar

  • h-index – Although originally conceived as an author-level metric, the h-index has been being applied to higher-order aggregations of research publications, including journals. Publishing in a high h-index journal maximises your chances of being cited by other authors and, consequently, may improve your own personal h-index score.

Other Tools for Assessing Journal Impact

  • ABDC Journal Quality List (Australian Business Deans Council) - useful for assessing the quality of journals related to business.
  • Compare sources tool - Scopus - compare sources based on citation metrics. Enables you to search for then select sources for comparison within either a chart or table view. You can compare up to 10 sources with a variety of parameters.

The main differences between Journal Indicators:

  • Based on Scopus (RIP and SNIP) vs. based on Web of Science (JIF).
  • Correction for field differences (SNIP) vs. no correction for field differences (RIP and JIF).
  • Three years of cited publications (RIP and SNIP) vs. two years of cited publications (JIF).
  • Citations from selected sources and selected document types only (RIP and SNIP) vs. citations from all sources and document types (JIF).
  • Citations to selected document types only (RIP and SNIP) vs. citations to all document types (JIF).

For assistance in determining journal impact assessment, contact your School Librarian or refer to the Metrics Subject Guide.

Related Topics

Contact Us